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New Groton Conservation Trust parcel named in honor of June Johnson. Photo by Steve Lieman

 

In 1899 the bodies of the original raiders at Harper's Ferry were transported north and buried next to John Brown in North Elba, New York. The Reverend Joshua Young, then 24 years into his lengthy pastorate at First Parish Church in Groton presiding over the religious ceremonies.

by Joshua Vollmar   On February 14, 1899 -- Valentine’s Day -- a warm celebration was taking place at Dana House on the campus of Lawrence Academy facing Main Street next to the Minuteman Common, the rented accommodations of the Rev. Dr. Joshua Young, minister of the First Parish Church, and...
by Jeffrey Boutwell, Ph.D. On December 6, 1879, The Boston Globe glowingly described the newly installed Emancipation Group statue in Park Square as representing the “most interesting, the most important and the most sublime event... in the history of the world.”      The statue dedicated...

Preparing to remove the weather vane and directionals from the steeple of the Union Congregational Church, a first step in securing, repairing and restoring the steeple. The weather vane and directionals have been watching over Groton since 1826, the year Massachusetts’ John Adams, author of our Commonwealth’s constitution, and Thomas Jefferson died on July 4. By 1826 Groton had been a town for 171 years.

Photo by Ralph Wiechmann. A gallery of photos of Ralph Wiechmann’s photos and others are available at Steve’s Studio on the Groton Herald website.  http://grotonherald.com/image-galleries

 

by Russell Harris   The Groton Herald contacted Halsey Platt, owner of Platt Builders, for a status report on the Union Congregation Church steeple after a close inspection--thanks to the church’s hiring a massive crane for that purpose. [see photo]      Given the expense and logistics of...

Groton Firefighter/EMT Chris Fischer, a member of the Massachusetts State Forest Fire Team, traveled to Montana and Idaho to assist in the firefighting efforts at large forest fires in both those states.

 

by Connie Sartini   Groton Firefighter/EMT Chris Fischer, a member of the Massachusetts State Forest Fire Team, traveled to Montana and Idaho to assist in the firefighting efforts at large forest fires in both those states. The team is hired by the Federal Government through the State’s...
Indian Hill Music, the region’s premier non-profit center for music education and performance in Littleton has announced that it will be known as Groton Hill Music Center, with the fall 2022 opening of its new home for music, currently under construction in Groton.      Indian Hill Music has...

"Come now, and let us reason together." - Photo by Steve Lieman

 

Growing your own food was once a normal part of everyday life in Groton. Ever household had a garden often supplemented with wild foods foraged locally. A combination of inexpensive convenience foods along with job and time pressures changed our lives and the interest in locally grown and foraged wild foods de- clined. When everything was available at the supermarket, most people didn’t learn how food is grown or where it comes from. Now, many people are rediscovering the health benefits of connecting with nature and the positive impact foraging can have on our health. This week’s page one story is an account of a local man who delights in exploring the growing, discovery and preservation of locally grown and foraged foods

 

• His Interest in the Bounty of the Wild Parallels His Advocacy for Plant Diversity and His Leadership to Control Invasive Species in Town.   by Robert Stewart   When Johnny Appleseed propagated apple trees in the Midwest in the early 1800s, he created a sustainable food source that...

A Groton view of the Harvest Moon. Photo by Karen Riggert

 

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Groton Herald

Mailing Address
P.O. Box 610, Groton, Massachusetts 01450
 

Office
145 Main Street, Groton, Massachusetts 014510
[Prescott Community Center]
 

Telephone: 978-448-6061
 

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